Keeping the Green Line safe – The Minnesota Daily

Things I would not be allowed to say were I a public official … in The Minnesota Daily Keeping the Green Line safe :

“…

“Light rail trains empirically kill more people than buses,” said David Levinson, a civil engineering professor and transportation studies expert.

Metro Transit spokesman John Siqveland said the Green and Blue Lines were built with safety in mind and that the Green Line will generally run slower since it will travel through more densely populated areas.

The vast majority of light-rail and streetcar systems around the country run on street level, Siqveland said.

Metro Transit has two train routes and 125 bus routes. Of the 81 million rides Metro Transit gave last year, 86 percent of riders use buses and 14 percent use trains.

Since the Blue Line opened in June 2004, the agency’s buses have had 6,979 incidents, which resulted in five deaths. Like the light rail, the majority of collisions involved motor vehicles. Of the 145 bus incidents involving pedestrians, four were fatal.

“Buses serve a lot more people and run a lot more miles … but have fewer fatalities,” Levinson said. “The [fatality] rates are obviously much higher for light-rail trains. Still, it’s a lot safer than driving a car.”

The 11-mile light-rail route connecting downtown Minneapolis to downtown St. Paul is decades in the making and cost $957 million.

“It’s been built, so it’s too late. It’s an at-grade light-rail facility — there’s nothing we can do about it without spending another billion dollars,” Levinson said. “We don’t operate in this world to maximize safety and only safety; we have trade-offs.””

The low-friction nature of train travel makes it efficient, but it also makes stopping a problem, said Stephen Zitzow, Minnesota Traffic Observatory laboratory manager.

Each train weighs about 300,000 pounds, and bringing one to a complete stop from 55 mph takes the length of two football fields. At 20 mph, it takes 81 feet, Siqveland said.

“It doesn’t have the option to swerve out of the way of someone in the way,” Zitzow said. “The difference here is that most vehicles can maneuver much more than a light rail, which is stuck.”

Central Corridor project spokeswoman Laura Baenen said the Green Line will begin running before the Major League Baseball All-Star game at Target Field in July.

Baenen said the Metropolitan Council has taken many safety considerations, including creating a pedestrian mall and using posters and community educators.

Baenen said a street-level light-rail track is less costly than an underground or elevated one, which was “prohibitively expensive.”

Siqveland said part of the Metro Transit safety campaign will have links to its website posted at every train stop.

When asked if he’d visit the website, graduate student Hill said he most likely wouldn’t.

“If I am an example,” he said, “[other students] probably will not.”

See also this (presented at TRB) (which is a bit dated), still I think it is largely accurate. Another interesting tidbit is that urban autos kill relatively few people (on a per mile basis). More auto deaths (on a per capital, per mile, etc. basis) are rural.

Also note that the APTA Public Transportation Fact Book (p.26) does not break out LRT deaths, lumping that with rail transit. I wonder why.