Category Archives: poetry

On Our Way

394.*

ON OUR WAY

Stygian night envelopes the earth

Quiet disturbed with shouts of mirth

Two bright eyes that pierce the dark

Noisy toots add to the lark

We’re on our way.

 

Dawn breaks quickly in the east

Rising red sun in a glorious feast

Sends forth scintillating arms

Beckons us on with untold charms

We’re on our way

 

Thru lowlands we speed on

Thru green woods, then gone

Straight as the sparrow flies

Southward ho our path lies

We’re on our way

 

Over long miles of road

Our chariot bears its load

Of cheerful friends, seeking thrills

Seeking the blue grass hills

We’re on our way.

 

The Poetry of Jack Sewitch – Volume 1

On the road again

On the road again -
Just can’t wait to get on the road again.
The life I love is making music with my friends

And I can’t wait to get on the road again.
On the road again

Goin’ places that I’ve never been.
Seein’ things that I may never see again

And I can’t wait to get on the road again.
On the road again -
Like a band of gypsies we go down the highway
We’re the best of friends.
Insisting that the world keep turning our way

And our way
is on the road again.
Just can’t wait to get on the road again.
The life I love is makin’ music with my friends

And I can’t wait to get on the road again.
On the road again

Like a band of gypsies we go down the highway
We’re the best of friends

Insisting that the world keep turning our way

And our way
is on the road again.
Just can’t wait to get on the road again.
The life I love is makin’ music with my friends

And I can’t wait to get on the road again.
And I can’t wait to get on the road again.

– Willie Nelson

The Rolling English Road

Before the Roman came to Rye or out to Severn strode,
The rolling English drunkard made the rolling English road.
A reeling road, a rolling road, that rambles round the shire,
And after him the parson ran, the sexton and the squire;
A merry road, a mazy road, and such as we did tread
The night we went to Birmingham by way of Beachy Head.

I knew no harm of Bonaparte and plenty of the Squire,
And for to fight the Frenchman I did not much desire;
But I did bash their baggonets because they came arrayed
To straighten out the crooked road an English drunkard made,
Where you and I went down the lane with ale-mugs in our hands,
The night we went to Glastonbury by way of Goodwin Sands.

His sins they were forgiven him; or why do flowers run
Behind him; and the hedges all strengthening in the sun?
The wild thing went from left to right and knew not which was which,
But the wild rose was above him when they found him in the ditch.
God pardon us, nor harden us; we did not see so clear
The night we went to Bannockburn by way of Brighton Pier.

My friends, we will not go again or ape an ancient rage,
Or stretch the folly of our youth to be the shame of age,
But walk with clearer eyes and ears this path that wandereth,
And see undrugged in evening light the decent inn of death;
For there is good news yet to hear and fine things to be seen,
Before we go to Paradise by way of Kensal Green.

Source: The Collected Poems of G. K. Chesterton (1927)

The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Robert Frost

Song of the Open Road

excerpt from Song of the Open Road by Walt Whitman, from Leaves of Grass.

3
You air that serves me with breath to speak!
 
You objects that call from diffusion my meanings, and give them shape!   
You light that wraps me and all things in delicate equable showers!  
You paths worn in the irregular hollows by the roadsides!  
I think you are latent with unseen existences—you are so dear to me.  
  
You flagg’d walks of the cities! you strong curbs at the edges!  
You ferries! you planks and posts of wharves! you timber-lined sides! you distant ships!   
You rows of houses! you window-pierc’d façades! you roofs!  
You porches and entrances! you copings and iron guards!  
You windows whose transparent shells might expose so much!  
You doors and ascending steps! you arches!  
You gray stones of interminable pavements! you trodden crossings!   
From all that has been near you, I believe you have imparted to yourselves, and now would impart the same secretly to me;  
From the living and the dead I think you have peopled your impassive surfaces, and the spirits thereof would be evident and amicable with me.  
  
4
The earth expanding right hand and left hand,
 
The picture alive, every part in its best light,  
The music falling in where it is wanted, and stopping where it is not wanted,  
The cheerful voice of the public road—the gay fresh sentiment of the road.  
  
O highway I travel! O public road! do you say to me, Do not leave me?  
Do you say, Venture not? If you leave me, you are lost?  
Do you say, I am already prepared—I am well-beaten and undenied—adhere to me?  
  
O public road! I say back, I am not afraid to leave you—yet I love you;   
You express me better than I can express myself;  
You shall be more to me than my poem.  
  
I think heroic deeds were all conceiv’d in the open air, and all great poems also;  
I think I could stop here myself, and do miracles;  
(My judgments, thoughts, I henceforth try by the open air, the road;)   
I think whatever I shall meet on the road I shall like, and whoever beholds me shall like me;  
I think whoever I see must be happy.