GM demoes at CES

From the New York Times: G.M.s Fuel-Cell Car Makes a Statement. GM demoed a fuel cell powered Cadillac (the poorly named Provoq) and a modified Chevrolet Tahoe that drives itself. Neither is ready for production, but maybe we are finally asymptotically approaching the long-forecast future of cars that drive themselves and do not pollute.

Traffic jam as an indicator of success

Traffic jams are not a measure of failure in the transportation system, they are measures of success in the activity/land use system, to wit: would you rather be a candidate with a traffic jam (from Baltimore Sun): The Swamp: An Obama traffic jam
or one with no traffic at all (from San Diego Union Tribune)
News > Politics — Hunter keeps on, despite lacking funds, attention” href=”http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/politics/20080103-9999-1n3hunter.html”>Duncan Hunter keeps on, despite lacking funds, attention

Planning for Place and Plexus: Metropolitan Land Use and Transport

Planning for Place and Plexus: Metropolitan Land Use and Transport by David Levinson and Kevin Krizek is now out and available for pre-order. I received my copies today and am quite pleased with how it came out.
Growing out of a course we taught on transportation and land use (PA8202/CE8202: Networks and Places), the book took many years, and I need to think my co-author Kevin Krizek, the publisher Routledge, and their staff and contractors, notably Katy Low, Ben Woolhead, Andrew Craddock, Victoria Johnson, Eleanor Rivers, Jane Wilde, Kate McDevitt, David McBride, our artist Doug Benson, and CTS’s Peter Park Nelson for making this real. My mailbox storing correspondence I have received on the book (excluding what I sent) numbers 723 messages since July 2002. I don’t even want to think about how difficult this must have been without email.
The blurb on the book brochure says:
Planning for Place and Plexus provides a fresh and unique perspective
on metropolitan land use and transport networks, challenging current
planning strategies and offering frameworks to understand and evalu-
ate policy.
The book suggests actions for the future urban growth of metropolitan
areas and includes current and cutting edge theory, findings, and rec-
ommendations which are cleverly illustrated throughout using interna-
tional examples. It is a valuable resource for students, researchers,
practitioners, and policy advisors working across transport, land use,
and planning.
‘A lively, engaging book…which uses neoclassical economic principles…in a
digestible format. The authors go so far as to draw from the film “Thelma and
Louise” to show how game theory can be applied in predicting whether some-
one will drive or take public transit. This provocative, highly relevant book de-
serves to be on the bookshelf of everyone concerned with urban planning and
transportation.’
— Robert Cervero, Professor and Chair, Department of City and Regional Planning, University of California, Berkeley

a blog about Networks and Places

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